Horny


Last week I went to see “Horns” because of 3 things. First, it was directed by Alexandre Aja, whose remake of “The Hills Have Eyes” frightened me. Second, it’s based on a book by Joe Hill, son of horror master Stephen King. And finally, the lead actor is Daniel Radcliffe AKA Harry Potter.

horns_ver3_xlg

I first read Joe Hill’s “Heart-Shaped Box” a while back and I’m currently reading “NOS4A2”. So far what I like about his work is that he is quite adept at mixing and matching genres in the way he tells his stories. I’m not sure if he does this consciously or not. I’m more inclined to think that he is probably influenced by a wide range of genres and writing style and this permeates his work. I also think this is the case with many young(ish) writers. The so-called genres that someone my age grew up reading do not exist anymore. Everything has been touched by other things that it is more difficult to place writers and their work in distinct ‘boxes’.

Now, I haven’t read “Horns” the book but I learned the film was adapted faithfully from the book. And I could see that. Many aspects of the film evoke various genres; such as the murder-mystery (the search for the murderer of the lead’s girl), supernatural (spirits and ghosts), and horror (the horns and its powers). The flashback scenes felt like an homage to “Stand By Me”, which was adapted from Stephen King–Joe Hill’s father.

I’m not troubled by these elements because they never distracted me from the main story line. What I liked most about this film is the wicked humor, which some felt was rather silly. Some, meaning a handful of people my age who saw the film as well. The best part for me was when Ig made the throng of reporters who’d been harassing him fight for an exclusive interview. I’ve heard that working in broadcast news was akin to swimming with sharks. That scene embodied that notion very well.

Acting was fairly consistent across the young cast. Daniel Radcliffe in his hirsute glory has managed to obliterate all memories of the boy wizard in this outing. Not to mention his great accent work here. Juno Temple has the misfortune of looking a lot like Ellen Page so whenever I see her I think of Ellen. Max Minghella conveys seeming straightness of his character and at the same time, exudes an icky feeling that something is off with him.

At its core, “Horns” is a love story told in a wickedly funny manner, framed by supernatural elements, strewn with sex, drugs, and good music and youthful explorations of friendship, loyalty, and filial bonds.

Advertisements

About the pensive poet

development worker. kasuyo. bugtong na anak. retired drag queen. kalaguyo. kaibigan. future carpenter, bread-maker, or bar-tender. feeling manunulat at makata. borderline obsessive-compulsive. control freak. book worm. isnabero. mahiyain. astang cineaste. aspiring photographer.

Posted on November 26, 2014, in journal, review and tagged , , , , , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink. Leave a comment.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: